Shared booklist

BKLYN BookMatch Lives of Asian and Native American Women Pre-1945

This list was created by a librarian with the Brooklyn Public Library for a reader. Would you like your own personalized list of reading suggestions? Visit BKLYN BookMatch here: www.bklynpubliclibrary.org/readers-advisory

12 items

The diary of Lady Murasaki

translated and introduced by Richard Bowring. |

The ink dark Moon

by Ono no Komachi & Izumi Shikibu ; translated by Jane Hirshfield with Mariko Aratani. |

Li, Ch'ing-chao, complete poems.

Translated and edited by Kenneth Rexroth and Ling Chung. |

Tangled hair;

Translated from the Japanese by Sanford Goldstein and Seishi Shinoda. |

Mirabai

versions by Robert Bly and Jane Hirshfield. |

The broken wing;

by Sarojini Naidu. |

Citizen 13660

drawings & text by Minâe Okubo. |

Undaunted Women of Nanking: The Wartime Diaries of Minnie Vautrin and Tsen Shui-fang

Website

Hu, H. & Lian-hong, Z..The Undaunted Women of Nanking: The Wartime Diaries of Minnie Vautrin and Tsen Shui-fang. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2010. Project MUSE. Web. 21 Apr. 2016. <https://muse.jhu.edu/>.

Cherokee Sister: The Collected Writings of Catharine Brown

Website

Gaul, T. S. & Brown, C..Cherokee Sister: The Collected Writings of Catharine Brown, 1818-1823. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2014. Project MUSE. Web. 21 Apr. 2016. <https://muse.jhu.edu/>.

Alaska's Daughter by Elizabeth Pinson

Website

Pinson, E..Alaska's Daughter: An Eskimo Memoir of the 20th Century. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2004. Project MUSE. Web. 21 Apr. 2016. <https://muse.jhu.edu/>.

Memoirs of an Indian Woman by Shudha Mazumdar

Website

"This vivid memoir recounts the experience of Shudha Mazumdar, a woman born at the turn of the century to Indian parents whose ideas on child rearing differed greatly. Her father, a wealthy Europeanized Zamindar, tried to instill Western values, while Shudha's mother emphasized the traditional, even going as far as arranging a marriage for her daughter when she was thirteen. Although true to Indian traditions, Shudha eventually manifested her father's influence by becoming a published writer, by becoming a member of a number of social service organizations, and by serving as the Indian Delegate to the International Labour Organization."